Regulatory mechanisms link phenotypic plasticity to evolvability

Jordi van Gestel, Franz J. Weissing*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
254 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Organisms have a remarkable capacity to respond to environmental change. They can either respond directly, by means of phenotypic plasticity, or they can slowly adapt through evolution. Yet, how phenotypic plasticity links to evolutionary adaptability is largely unknown. Current studies of plasticity tend to adopt a phenomenological reaction norm (RN) approach, which neglects the mechanisms underlying plasticity. Focusing on a concrete question - the optimal timing of bacterial sporulation we here also consider a mechanistic approach, the evolution of a gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying plasticity. Using individual-based simulations, we compare the RN and GRN approach and find a number of striking differences. Most importantly, the GRN model results in a much higher diversity of responsive strategies than the RN model. We show that each of the evolved strategies is pre-adapted to a unique set of unseen environmental conditions. The regulatory mechanisms that control plasticity therefore critically link phenotypic plasticity to the adaptive potential of biological populations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number24524
Number of pages15
JournalScientific Reports
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18-Apr-2016

Keywords

  • CRYPTIC GENETIC-VARIATION
  • BACILLUS-SUBTILIS
  • REACTION NORMS
  • SPORULATION
  • EVOLUTION
  • INFORMATION
  • BIOFILM
  • SIGNALS
  • ROBUSTNESS
  • ENVIRONMENTS

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