Role of T2 inflammation biomarkers in severe asthma

Amit D. Parulekar, Zuzana Diamant, Nicola A. Hanania*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

    43 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose of reviewSevere asthma is a heterogeneous syndrome. Classification of asthma into phenotypes and endotypes can improve understanding and treatment of the disease. Identification and utilization of biomarkers, particularly those linked to T2 inflammation, can help group patients into phenotypes, predict those who will respond to a specific therapy, and assess the response to treatment.Recent findingsBiomarkers are present in sputum, exhaled breath, and blood of patients with asthma. These include sputum eosinophils and neutrophils, fractional excretion of nitric oxide, blood eosinophilia, IgE, and periostin. Many of these biomarkers are associated with eosinophilic inflammation propagated mainly by T2 cytokines such as IL-5 and IL-13, which are released from Th2 cells and Type 2 innate lymphoid cells. Biomarkers have been utilized in recent trials of novel biologic agents targeted at T2 inflammation and may contribute to the defining population who would respond to these therapies.SummaryDespite advances in the identification and utilization of asthma biomarkers, further studies are needed to better clarify the role of biomarkers, individually or in combination, in the diagnosis and treatment of severe asthma. Future therapeutic trials should include the use of biomarkers in their design, which may lead to a more personalized approach to therapy and improved outcomes.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)59-68
    Number of pages10
    JournalCurrent Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine
    Volume22
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan-2016

    Keywords

    • biomarkers
    • phenotypes
    • severe asthma
    • T2 inflammation
    • EXHALED NITRIC-OXIDE
    • SEVERE EOSINOPHILIC ASTHMA
    • EXPIRED BREATH CONDENSATE
    • INNATE LYMPHOID-CELLS
    • STEROID-NAIVE ASTHMA
    • AIR-FLOW LIMITATION
    • TO-SEVERE ASTHMA
    • INDUCED SPUTUM
    • INHALED CORTICOSTEROIDS
    • PERSISTENT ASTHMA

    Cite this