Room Sharing in Hospitalized Children With Bronchiolitis and the Occurrence of Hospital-Acquired Infections: A Prospective Cohort Study

Jolita Bekhof*, Mirjam Wessels, Eline Ten Velde, Minke Hoekstra, Veerle Langenhorst, Lesla Bruijnesteijn, Paul L P Brand, Gijs J H M Ruijs

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and severity of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) in children hospitalized for bronchiolitis when patients share a room, irrespective of the causative virus.

METHODS: A prospective cohort study during 4 winter seasons (2012-2016) was conducted in a Dutch general pediatric ward including otherwise healthy children <2 years of age hospitalized for bronchiolitis. Patients shared a 1-to-4-bed hospital room irrespective of virological diagnosis. The main outcome measures were HAIs assessed through multiplex polymerase chain reaction and disease severity.

RESULTS: HAIs occurred in 28 of 218 included patients (12.8%), most frequently with rhinovirus (17 of 28; 60.7%). In 3 (10.7%) of 28 HAIs, the same virus was identified in roommates. Only 1 patient became cross-infected with respiratory syncytial virus, although this patient never shared a room with a patient infected with respiratory syncytial virus. HAI was not associated with more severe disease. The median length of hospitalization was 3.5 days (interquartile range [IQR] 1-6) compared with 3 days (IQR 2-6; P = .86); the number of PICU admissions was 0% versus 5.3% (P = .21); the median days of oxygen supplementation was 2.5 (IQR 1-4) versus 2 (IQR 1-4; P = .58); the median days of tube feeding was 2 (IQR 0-5) versus 2 (interquartile range: 0-5; P = .77); and the readmission rate was 0% versus 5.8% (P = .19) in patients with and without HAI, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: HAIs among patients with bronchiolitis are common but not associated with more severe disease. Room sharing with appropriate hygiene does not play a relevant role in the transmission of viruses between patients with bronchiolitis, regardless of the viruses involved. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that room sharing of patients with bronchiolitis is safe.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)415-422
Number of pages8
JournalHospital pediatrics
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun-2019

Keywords

  • Bronchiolitis/diagnosis
  • Child, Hospitalized/statistics & numerical data
  • Child, Preschool
  • Cross Infection/epidemiology
  • Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control
  • Female
  • Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data
  • Male
  • Netherlands/epidemiology
  • Patients' Rooms/standards
  • Prospective Studies
  • Virus Diseases/classification

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