Secondary Sensory Area SII is Crucially Involved in the Preparation of Familiar Movements Compared to Movements Never Made Before

M. Beudel*, S. Zijlstra, Th. Mulder, I. Zijdewind, B. M. de Jong

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Secondary sensorimotor regions are involved in sensorimotor integration and movement preparation. These regions take part in parietal-premotor circuitry that is not only active during motor execution but also during movement observation and imagery. This activation particularly occurs when observed movements belong to one's own motor repertoire, consistent with the finding that motor imagery only improves performance when one can actually make such movement. We aimed to investigate whether imagery or observation of a movement that was never made before causes parietal-premotor activation or that the ability to perform this movement is indeed a precondition. Nine subjects [ group Already Knowing It (AKI)] could abduct their hallux (moving big toe outward). Seven subjects initially failed to make such movement (Absolute Zero A0 group). They had to imagine, observe, or execute this movement, whereas fMRI data were obtained both before and after training. Contrasting abduction observation between the AKI-group and A0-group showed increased left SII and supplementary motor area activation. Comparing the observation of hallux flexion with abduction showed increased bilateral SII activation in the A0 and not in the AKI group. Prolonged training resulted in equal performance and similar cerebral activation patterns in the two groups. Thereby, conjunction analysis of the correlations on subject's range of abduction during execution, imagery, and observation of hallux abduction showed exclusive bilateral SII activation. The reduced SII involvement in A0 may imply that effective interplay between sensory predictions and feedback does not take place without actual movement experience. However, this can be acquired by training. Hum Brain Mapp 32:564-579, 2011. (C) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)564-579
    Number of pages16
    JournalHuman brain mapping
    Volume32
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr-2011

    Keywords

    • motor learning
    • fMRI
    • motor imagery
    • Mirror Neuron System
    • corollary discharge
    • secondary sensory
    • POSITRON-EMISSION-TOMOGRAPHY
    • MOTOR IMAGERY
    • HAND ACTIONS
    • SOMATOTOPIC ORGANIZATION
    • SENSORIMOTOR INTEGRATION
    • CEREBRAL ACTIVATION
    • CORTICAL ACTIVATION
    • PARIETAL CORTEX
    • FOOT MOVEMENTS
    • FMRI

    Cite this