SENSITIZATION TO CISPLATIN ACTION BY STEP-DOWN HEATING IN CDDP-SENSITIVE AND CDDP-RESISTANT CELLS

JVE HETTINGA*, W LEMSTRA, EGE DEVRIES, AWT KONINGS, HH KAMPINGA

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hyperthermia treatment (greater than or equal to 43 degrees C) has been shown to be able to (partially) reverse acquired cDDP resistance. However, such heat treatment is difficult to achieve in the clinic. Short pre-treatment at a high temperature (> 42 degrees C), immediately before a treatment at a lower temperature (<42 degrees C) can enhance the heat toxicity of the lower temperatures. This ''step-down heating schedule'' was explored for its possible drug-sensitizing potential in in vitro-cultured cDDP-sensitive and -resistant murine and human tumour cells. A 10-min pre-treatment at 44 degrees C enhanced the cytotoxicity of 41 degrees C hyperthermia alone. It also enhanced sensitivity to cDDP when given at 37 degrees C. However, it did not increase the 41 degrees C-induced cDDP sensitization. Thus, no correlation was found between heat kill and cDDP sensitization for step-down heating schedules. The observed effects of step-down heating were comparable in sensitive and in resistant cells, so the step-down heating schedule, unlike the 43 degrees C treatment, did not lead to a decrease of the cDDP-resistance factor. Yet the total cytotoxicity caused by this treatment protocol was 10-fold more than for cDDP with 41 degrees C alone, due to the extra hyperthermic cell killing and the cDDP-sensitizing effect of the pre-treatment. This treatment could have a substantial impact on cDDP efficacy in the clinic even when cDDP resistance has developed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)722-726
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume61
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 29-May-1995

Keywords

  • HAMSTER OVARY CELLS
  • CYTO-TOXICITY
  • HYPERTHERMIA
  • LINE
  • 43-DEGREES-C
  • SUBLINE
  • DRUG

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