Sharper angle, higher risk? The effect of cutting angle on knee mechanics in invasion sport athletes

Mervin J. Schreurs, Anne Benjaminse*, Koen A. P. M. Lemmink

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Cutting is an important skill in team-sports, but unfortunately is also related to non-contact ACL injuries. The purpose was to examine knee kinetics and kinematics at different cutting angles.

Material and methods: 13 males and 16 females performed cuts at different angles (45°, 90°, 135° and 180°) at maximum speed. 3D kinematics and kinetics were collected. To determine differences across cutting angles (45°, 90°, 135° and 180°) and sex (female, male), a 4 × 2 repeated measures ANOVA was conducted followed by post hoc comparisons (Bonferroni) with alpha level set at α ≤ 0.05 a priori.

Results: At all cutting angles, males showed greater knee flexion angles than females (p < 0.01). Also, where males performed all cutting angles with no differences in the amount of knee flexion −42.53° ± 8.95°, females decreased their knee flexion angle from −40.6° ± 7.2° when cutting at 45° to −36.81° ± 9.10° when cutting at 90°, 135° and 180° (p < 0.01). Knee flexion moment decreased for both sexes when cutting towards sharper angles (p < 0.05). At 90°, 135° and 180°, males showed greater knee valgus moments than females. For both sexes, knee valgus moment increased towards the sharper cutting angles and then stabilized compared to the 45° cutting angle (p < 0.01). Both females and males showed smaller vGRF when cutting to sharper angles (p < 0.01).

Conclusion: It can be concluded that different cutting angles demand different knee kinematics and kinetics. Sharper cutting angles place the knee more at risk. However, females and males handle this differently, which has implications for injury prevention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)144-150
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of biomechanics
Volume63
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3-Oct-2017

Keywords

  • Cutting
  • Knee
  • Biomechanics
  • Anterior cruciate ligament
  • CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY
  • ACL INJURY
  • FEEDBACK TECHNIQUES
  • FEMALE
  • PLAYERS
  • SOCCER
  • SIDESTEP
  • MOMENTS
  • JOINT
  • PERFORMANCE

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