Short-Term Consumption of Sucralose with, but Not without, Carbohydrate Impairs Neural and Metabolic Sensitivity to Sugar in Humans

Jelle R. Dalenberg, Barkha P. Patel, Raphael Denis, Maria G. Veldhuizen, Yuko Nakamura, Petra C. Vinke, Serge Luquet, Dana M. Small*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    24 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There is a general consensus that overconsumption of sugar-sweetened beverages contributes to the prevalence of obesity and related comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Whether a similar relationship exists for no- or low-calorie "diet'' drinks is a subject of intensive debate and controversy. Here, we demonstrate that consuming seven sucralose-sweetened beverages with, but not without, a carbohydrate over 10 days decreases insulin sensitivity in healthy human participants, an effect that correlates with reductions in midbrain, insular, and cingulate responses to sweet, but not sour, salty, or savory, taste as assessed with fMRI. Taste perception was unaltered and consuming the carbohydrate alone had no effect. These findings indicate that consumption of sucralose in the presence of a carbohydrate rapidly impairs glucose metabolism and results in longer-term decreases in brain, but not perceptual sensitivity to sweet taste, suggesting dysregulation of gut-brain control of glucose metabolism.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)493-502.e7
    Number of pages17
    JournalCell metabolism
    Volume31
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 3-Mar-2020

    Keywords

    • HIGH-INTENSITY SWEETENERS
    • LOW-CALORIE SWEETENERS
    • WEIGHT-GAIN
    • GLUCOSE-HOMEOSTASIS
    • INSULIN-RESISTANCE
    • BODY-WEIGHT
    • NONNUTRITIVE SWEETENERS
    • ARTIFICIAL SWEETENER
    • HORMONAL RESPONSES
    • TASTE RECEPTOR

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