Solute transport and energy transduction in bacteria

Wil N Konings, Bert Poolman, Hendrik W van Veen

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    Abstract

    In bacteria two forms of metabolic energy are usually present, i.e. ATP and transmembrane ion-gradients, that can be used to drive the various endergonic reactions associated with cellular growth. ATP can be formed directly in substrate level phosphorylation reactions whereas primary transport processes can generate the ion-gradients across the cytoplasmic membrane. The two forms of metabolic energy can be interconverted by the action of ion-translocating ATPases. For fermentative organisms it has long been thought that ion-gradients could only be generated at the expense of ATP hydrolysis by the F0F1-ATPase. In the present article, an overview is given of the various secondary transport processes that form ion-gradients at the expense of precursor (substrate) and/or end-product concentration gradients. The metabolic energy formed by these chemiosmotic circuits contributes to the 'energy status' of the bacterial cell which is particularly important for anaerobic/fermentative organisms.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)369-380
    Number of pages12
    JournalAntonie Van Leeuwenhoek: International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology
    Volume65
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1994

    Keywords

    • ANTIPORT
    • CHEMIOSMOSIS
    • EXCHANGE
    • METABOLIC ENERGY CONSERVATION
    • SYMPORT
    • ELECTROCHEMICAL PROTON GRADIENT
    • ESCHERICHIA-COLI
    • STREPTOCOCCUS-LACTIS
    • PHOSPHATE-TRANSPORT
    • MALOLACTIC FERMENTATION
    • KINETIC MECHANISM
    • FUNCTIONAL RECONSTITUTION
    • ANAEROBIC DEGRADATION
    • ORNITHINE ANTIPORTER
    • NUCLEOTIDE-SEQUENCE

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