Abstract

Late-life late-onset depression (LLD, depression with an age of onset above
60 years) appears to differ from depression with early onset in its association
with cerebral small vessel disease, beta-amyloid and tau deposition, and neurodegenerative processes. Multimodality imaging (SPECT, PET, MRI) supports
this concept and the notion that late-life depression relies on dysfunctioning of
the frontal lobe, but also highlights that mechanisms underlying late-onset
depression are heterogeneous and diverse. The future of PET and SPECT imaging
in depression research relies on progress in data analysis, the development of
novel molecular probes for specific cerebral targets, and combination of different imaging modalities (e.g., PET and MRI). Relatively unexplored areas for future research are gender differences, longitudinal changes of brain function associated with subclinical and clinical depression, and analysis of the default network activity.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPET and SPECT in Psychiatry
EditorsRudi A.J.O. Dierckx, Andreas Otte, Erik F.J. de Vries, Aren van Waarde, Iris E.C. Sommer
Place of PublicationCham
PublisherSpringer Nature
Chapter5
Pages209-244
Number of pages36
Edition2
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-030-57230-3
ISBN (Print)978-3-030-57231-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY
  • Single photon emission computed tomography
  • LATE-LIFE DEPRESSION
  • HUMAN BRAIN
  • cerebral glucose metabolism
  • NEUROINFLAMMATION
  • METABOTROPIC GLUTAMATE RECEPTORS
  • CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW
  • ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY
  • NICOTINIC RECEPTORS
  • AMYLOID DEPOSITION

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