Sphagnum farming from species selection to the production of growing media: A review

G. Gaudig*, M. Krebs, A. Prager, S. Wichmann, M. Barney, S. J. M. Caporn, M. Emmel, C. Fritz, M. Graf, A. Grobe, S. Gutierrez Pacheco, S. Hogue-Hugron, S. Holztraeger, S. Irrgang, A. Kamarainen, E. Karofeld, G. Koch, J. F. Koebbing, S. Kumar, I. MatchutadzeC. Oberpaur, J. Oestmann, P. Raabe, D. Rammes, L. Rochefort, G. Schmilewksi, J. Sendzikaite, A. Smolders, B. St-Hilaire, B. van de Riet, B. Wright, N. Wright, L. Zoch, H. Joosten

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    866 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Sphagnum farming - the production of Sphagnum biomass on rewetted bogs - helps towards achieving global climate goals by halting greenhouse gas emissions from drained peat and by replacing peat with a renewable biomass alternative. Large-scale implementation of Sphagnum farming requires a wide range of know-how, from initial species selection up to the final production and use of Sphagnum biomass based growing media in horticulture. This article provides an overview of relevant knowledge accumulated over the last 15 years and identifies open questions.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number13
    Number of pages30
    JournalMires and Peat
    Volume20
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017

    Keywords

    • bog
    • founder material
    • harvest
    • horticulture
    • management
    • paludiculture
    • Paris Agreement
    • peatland
    • peat moss
    • sustainable land use
    • water quality
    • ATMOSPHERIC NITROGEN DEPOSITION
    • WATER-TABLE
    • BARE PEAT
    • MOSSES
    • BOG
    • GROWTH
    • PEATLANDS
    • LEVEL
    • MAGELLANICUM
    • REGENERATION

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Sphagnum farming from species selection to the production of growing media: A review'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this