Staphylococcal Adhesion, Detachment and Transmission on Nanopillared Si Surfaces

Ferdi Hizal, Chang-Hwan Choi, Henk J. Busscher, Henny C. van der Mei*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanostructured surfaces are extensively considered with respect to their potential impact on bacterial adhesion from aqueous suspensions or air, but in real-life bacteria are often transmitted between surfaces. Mechanistically, transmission involves detachment of adhering bacteria from a donor and adhesion to a receiver surface, controlled by the relative values of the adhesion forces exerted by both surfaces. We here relate staphylococcal adhesion, detachment and transmission to, from, and between smooth and nanopillared-Si surfaces with staphylococcal adhesion forces. Nanopillared-Si surfaces were prepared with pillar-to pillar distances of 200, 400, and 800 nm. On smooth surfaces, staphylococcal adhesion forces, measured using bacterial-probe Atomic-Force-Microscopy, amounted to 4.4-6.8 and 1.8-2.1 nN (depending on the AFM-loading force) for extracellular-polymeric-substances (EPS) producing and non-EPS producing strains, respectively. Accordingly the EPS producing strain adhered in higher numbers than the non-EPS producing strain. Fractional adhesion forces on nanopillared-Si surfaces relative to the smooth surface ranged from 0.30 to 0.95, depending on AFM-loading force, strain and pillar-to-pillar distance. However, for each strain, the number of adhering bacteria remained similar on all nanopillared surfaces. Detachment of adhering staphylococci decreased significantly with increasing adhesion forces, while staphylococcal transmission to a receiver surface also decreased with increasing adhesion force exerted by the donor. In addition, the strain with ability to produce EPS was killed in high percentages and induced to produce EPS during transmission on nanopillared-Si surfaces, presumably by high local cell-wall stresses. This must be accounted for in applications of nanostructured surfaces: whereas killing may be favorable, EPS production may reduce antimicrobial efficacy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30430-30439
Number of pages10
JournalACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Volume8
Issue number44
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9-Nov-2016

Keywords

  • staphylococci
  • bacterial adhesion
  • bacterial detachment
  • bacterial transmission
  • pressure-induced EPS
  • adhesion force
  • atomic force microscopy
  • nanostructured surfaces
  • ATOMIC-FORCE MICROSCOPE
  • FOODBORNE PATHOGENS
  • BACTERIAL BIOFILMS
  • ESCHERICHIA-COLI
  • CONTAMINATION
  • INFECTIONS
  • NANOTUBES
  • ROUGHNESS
  • SURVIVAL
  • COATINGS

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