Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses of the Procedure-specific Risks of Thrombosis and Bleeding in General Abdominal, Colorectal, Upper-Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery

ROTBIGGS Investigators, Lauri I Lavikainen*, Gordon H Guyatt, Ville J Sallinen, Paul J Karanicolas, Rachel J Couban, Tino Singh, Yung Lee, Jaana Elberkennou, Riikka Aaltonen, Kaisa Ahopelto, Ines Beilmann-Lehtonen, Marco H Blanker, Jovita L Cárdenas, Rufus Cartwright, Samantha Craigie, P J Devereaux, Herney A Garcia-Perdomo, Fang Zhou Ge, Huda A GomaaAlex L E Halme, Jari Haukka, Päivi K Karjalainen, Tuomas P Kilpeläinen, Antti J Kivelä, Hanna Lampela, Anne K Mattila, Borna Tadayon Najafabadi, Taina P Nykänen, Sanjay Pandanaboyana, Negar Pourjamal, Chathura B B Ratnayake, Aleksi R Raudasoja, Robin W M Vernooij, Philippe D Violette, Yuting Wang, Yingqi Xiao, Liang Yao, Kari A O Tikkinen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
45 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To provide procedure-specific estimates of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) and major bleeding following abdominal surgery.

SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Use of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis represents a trade-off that depends on VTE and bleeding risks that vary between procedures; their magnitude remains uncertain.

METHODS: We identified observational studies reporting procedure-specific risks of symptomatic VTE or major bleeding after abdominal surgery; adjusted the reported estimates for thromboprophylaxis and length of follow-up; and estimated cumulative incidence at 4 weeks post-surgery, stratified by VTE risk groups; and rated evidence certainty.

RESULTS: After eligibility screening, 285 studies (8,048,635 patients) reporting on 40 general abdominal, 36 colorectal, 15 upper-gastrointestinal, and 24 hepatopancreatobiliary surgery procedures proved eligible. Evidence certainty proved generally moderate or low for VTE and low or very low for bleeding requiring reintervention. The risk of VTE varied substantially between procedures: in general abdominal surgery from a median of <0.1% in laparoscopic cholecystectomy to a median of 3.7% in open small bowel resection; in colorectal from 0.3% in minimally-invasive sigmoid colectomy to 10.0% in emergency open total proctocolectomy; and in upper-gastrointestinal/hepatopancreatobiliary from 0.2% in laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy to 6.8% in open distal pancreatectomy for cancer.

CONCLUSIONS: VTE thromboprophylaxis provides net benefit through VTE reduction with small increase in bleeding in some procedures (e.g., open colectomy, open pancreaticoduodenectomy), whereas the opposite is true in others (e.g., laparoscopic cholecystectomy, elective groin hernia repairs). In many procedures, thromboembolism and bleeding risks are similar, and decisions depend on individual risk prediction and values and preferences regarding VTE and bleeding.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-225
Number of pages13
JournalAnnals of Surgery
Volume279
Issue number2
Early online date8-Aug-2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb-2024

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