Targeting apoptosis pathways in lung cancer

Milind M. Pore, T. Jeroen N. Hiltermann, Frank A. E. Kruyt*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lung cancer is a devastating disease with a poor prognosis. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) represent different forms of lung cancer that are associated with distinct genetic causes and display different responses to therapy in the clinic. Whereas SCLC is often sensitive to chemotherapy at start of treatment, NSCLC are less chemo-sensitive. In NSCLC different histological subtypes are distinguished and increasing efforts are made to identify subtypes that respond to specific therapies, such as those harbouring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations that have benefit from treatment with EGFR inhibitors. Targeting of the apoptotic machinery represents another approach that aims to selectively kill cancer cells while sparing normal ones. Here we describe different ways that are currently explored to induce apoptosis in lung cancer cells, specifically pathways controlled by TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), BCL-2 family members and apoptosis inhibitory proteins (IAPs). Preclinical studies are discussed and for some agents results from early clinical studies and future perspectives are considered. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)359-368
Number of pages10
JournalCancer letters
Volume332
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28-May-2013

Keywords

  • Lung cancer
  • Apoptosis
  • TRAIL
  • XIAP
  • Survivin
  • BCL-2
  • Therapy
  • BCL-2 FAMILY PROTEINS
  • TRAIL-INDUCED APOPTOSIS
  • ADVANCED SOLID TUMORS
  • AGONISTIC MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY
  • MOLECULE SURVIVIN SUPPRESSANT
  • DEPENDENT CASPASE ACTIVATION
  • DEATH RECEPTOR 5
  • B-CELL LYMPHOMA
  • PHASE-I TRIAL
  • ANTISENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDE

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