TB-HIV co-infection in the Netherlands: estimating prevalence and under-reporting in national registration databases using a capture-recapture analysis

Frank van Leth*, Kirsten Evenblij, Ferdinand Wit, Albert Kiers, Herman Sprenger, Maurits Verhagen, Mariska Hillebregt, Nico Kalisvaart, Henrieke Schimmel, Annelies Verbon

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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    Abstract

    Background Knowledge of the HIV status in patients with tuberculosis (TB) and vice versa is crucial for proper individual patient management, while knowledge of the prevalence of co-infection guides preventive and therapeutic strategies. The aim of the study was to assess if national disease databases on TB and HIV are adequate sources to provide this information.

    Methods A two way capture-recapture analysis to assess the completeness of the registers, and to obtain the prevalence of TB-HIV co-infection in the Netherlands in the years 2002-2012.

    Results HIV testing was performed in less than 50% of the patients with TB. Of the 932 TB-HIV infected patients, just 293 (31.4%) were registered in both registers. Under-reporting of TB-HIV co-infection ranged from 50% to 70% in the national TB register, and from 31% to 37% in the HIV database. Prevalence of TB-HIV co-infection in the Netherlands in 2012 was 7.1% (95% CI 6.0% to 8.3%), which was more than double of the prevalence estimated from the national TB database.

    Conclusions TB-HIV co-infection is markedly under-reported in national disease databases. There is an urgent need for improved registration and preferably a routine data exchange between the two surveillance systems.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)556-560
    Number of pages5
    JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
    Volume70
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun-2016

    Keywords

    • ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY
    • TUBERCULOSIS
    • EPIDEMIOLOGY
    • COUNTRIES
    • DISEASE
    • POLICY
    • RISK

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