Testing an attachment method for solar-powered tracking devices on a long-distance migrating shorebird

Ying Chi Chan, Maarten Brugge, T. Lee Tibbitts, Anne Dekinga, Ron Porter, Raymond Klaassen, Theunis Piersma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Small solar-powered satellite transmitters and GPS data loggers enable continuous, multi-year, and global tracking of birds. What is lacking, however, are reliable methods to attach these tracking devices to small migratory birds so that (1) flight performance is not impacted and (2) tags are retained during periods of substantial mass change associated with long-distance migration. We developed a full-body harness to attach tags to Red Knots (Calidris canutus), a medium-sized shorebird (average mass 124 g) that undertakes long-distance migrations. First, we shedding was alleviated by switching to smoothed-bottom tags and monofilament harness lines. To field-trial this design, we deployed 5-g satellite transmitters on ten Red Knots released on 3 October 2013 in the Dutch Wadden Sea. Bird movements and tag performance appeared normal. However, nine tags stopped transmitting 11–170 days post-release which was earlier than expected. We attribute this to bird mortality rather than failure of the attachments or transmitters and suggest that the extra weight and drag caused by the tag and its feather-blocking shield increased the chance of depredation by the locally common Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus). Our results demonstrate that species- and place-specific contexts can strongly determine tagging success. While captive trials are an important first step in developing an attachment method, field trials are essential to fully assess attachment designs.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Ornithology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan-2016

Keywords

  • KNOTS CALIDRIS-CANUTUS
  • SATELLITE TELEMETRY
  • HABITAT USE
  • WADDEN SEA
  • BEHAVIOR
  • BIRDS
  • TRANSMITTERS
  • AUSTRALIA
  • STOPOVER
  • HARNESS

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