The acute effects of two types of physical activity in physical education on response inhibition and lapses of attention in children aged 8-10 years A cluster randomized controlled trial

Irene M. J. van der Fels*, Joanne Smith, J. Roel, Marsh Konigs, Jaap Oosterlaan, Chris Visscher, Esther Hartman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate whether (1) acute physical activity has positive effects on response inhibition and lapses of attention; and (2) cognitively engaging physical activity has stronger effects on response inhibition and lapses of attention than aerobic physical activity. Children (n = 89) were randomly assigned to the aerobic or cognitively engaging intervention, or a control condition. Response inhibition and lapses of attention were measured with a stop-signal task using a pre-post design. Multilevel analysis revealed no significant beneficial effect of acute physical activity on response inhibition and lapses of attention, nor differences between the interventions. However, more time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) led to better response inhibition and reduced lapses of attention. It is concluded that positive effects of acute physical activity on response inhibition and lapses of attention are dependent on the intensity and duration, without indications for differential effects of the type of activity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-182
Number of pages25
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Psychology
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Executive functions
  • Exercise
  • Primary school children
  • ACUTE AEROBIC EXERCISE
  • EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS
  • ACTIVITY INTERVENTIONS
  • COORDINATIVE EXERCISE
  • COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE
  • ACADEMIC-ACHIEVEMENT
  • PROBABILITY
  • FITNESS
  • ADULTS

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