The attentional blink in typically developing and reading-disabled children

Barry J.A. de Groot, Kees P. van den Bos, Bieuwe F. van der Meulen, Alexander E.M.G. Minnaert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

This study’s research question was whether selective visual attention, and specifically the attentional blink (AB) as operationalized by a dual target rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task, can explain individual differences in word reading (WR) and reading-related phonological performances in typically developing children and reading-disabled subgroups. A total of 407 Dutch school children (Grades 3–6) were classified either as typically developing (n = 302) or as belonging to one of three reading-disabled subgroups: reading disabilities only (RD-only, n = 69), both RD and attention problems (RD+ADHD, n = 16), or both RD and a specific language impairment (RD+SLI, n = 20). The RSVP task employed alphanumeric stimuli that were presented in two blocks. Standardized Dutch tests were used to measure WR, phonemic awareness (PA), and alphanumeric rapid naming (RAN). Results indicate that, controlling for PA and RAN performance, general RSVP task performance contributes significant unique variance to the prediction of WR. Specifically, consistent group main effects for the parameter of ABminimum were found, whereas there were no AB-specific effects (i.e., ABwidth and ABamplitude) except for the RD+SLI group. Finally, there was a group by measurement interaction, indicating that the RD-only and comorbid groups are differentially sensitive for prolonged testing sessions. These results suggest that more general factors involved in RSVP processing may explain the group differences found.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-70
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Experimental Child Psychology
Volume139
Issue numberNovember
Early online date14-Jun-2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER
  • PHONOLOGICAL MEMORY DEFICITS
  • SERIAL VISUAL PRESENTATION
  • DEVELOPMENTAL DYSLEXIA
  • LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT
  • DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER
  • WORKING-MEMORY
  • SPAN DEFICIT
  • TERM-MEMORY
  • DISABILITY

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