The effects of a stress-management training program in individuals at risk in the community at large

IGH Timmerman*, PMG Emmelkamp, R Sanderman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study we examine the effects of a stress-management training program on individuals without serious (mental) health complaints but with an increased chance of developing them as a consequence of stress. Potential subjects were randomly selected from the community at large and, then screened for participation in the training program if some of several (mental) health risk factors could be attributed to them: past life-events, neuroticism, inassertiveness, avoidant coping style and lack of social support. The control group, which did not take part in the training program, consisted of individuals with a similar risk profile as those in the training group. The training program consisted of several stress-management techniques: changing unhealthy life-style, relaxation training, problem-solving training and social skills-training. Multivariate analyses of variance showed that the training group, as compared to the control group, reported significantly less distress,less trait anxiety, less daily hassles, more assertiveness and more satisfaction with social support at follow-up. There were, however, no significant changes found in the coping skills of either group. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)863-875
Number of pages13
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume36
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - Sep-1998

Keywords

  • SOCIAL SUPPORT
  • BYPASS-SURGERY
  • LIFE EVENTS
  • PERSONALITY
  • MODERATOR
  • VARIABLES
  • ANXIETY
  • ILLNESS

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