The influence of chromatic and achromatic variability on chromatic induction and perceived colour

E Brenner*, FW Cornelissen

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Judgments of the colour of a surface are influenced by the colour of the surrounding. To determine whether only the average colour of the surrounding matters, or also the chromatic variability, judgments in colourful scenes are often compared with ones in which a target is surrounded by a plain background that provides the same average physical illumination of the retina as the colourful scene. The variability sometimes makes a difference (eg Shevell and Wei, 1998 Vision Research 38 1561 - 1566), and sometimes it does not (eg Brenner and Cornelissen, 1998 Vision Research 38 1789 - 1793). Is this because of the nonlinearity in cone responses? We designed scenes that stimulated the cones in an equivalent manner, both on average and in terms of variability, and yet differed markedly in chromatic variability. The more colourful surroundings had considerably less influence on subjects' colour judgments. We conclude that early cone-specific regulation of sensitivity cannot be responsible for the change in perceived colour, and deduce that chromatic induction takes place after contrast gain control.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)225-232
    Number of pages8
    JournalPerception
    Volume31
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2002

    Keywords

    • CONE-EXCITATION RATIOS
    • PRIMATE RETINA
    • CONSTANCY
    • ADAPTATION
    • CONTEXT
    • VISION
    • APPEARANCE
    • MECHANISMS
    • CONTRAST
    • NETWORK

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