The influence of coping styles and perceived control on emotional distress in persons at risk for a hereditary heart disease

Ehy Hoedemaekers, Jan P. C. Jaspers*, J. Peter Van Tintelen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This prospective study investigates the influence of two coping styles (monitoring and blunting) and perceived control (health loci-is of control and mastery) on emotional distress in persons at risk of a hereditary cardiac disease. Emotional distress in people at risk for a hereditary cardiac disease does not differ from the normal population, neither before nor after disclosure of the DNA-or clinical test results. Less monitoring reflects less emotional distress before the results of the DNA-test or clinical investigations are known, while a stronger feeling of mastery reflects less emotional distress both before and after the results of the tests are known. These results indicate that the negative effect of monitoring is temporary. Mastery is a more powerful predictor than health loci-is of control in this situation. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1997-2005
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
Volume143A
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1-Sep-2007

Keywords

  • coping
  • perceived control
  • hereditary cardiac disease
  • genetic testing
  • psychological distress
  • LONG-QT SYNDROME
  • BREAST-CANCER PATIENTS
  • INFORMATION SEEKING
  • CARDIAC-ARRHYTHMIAS
  • MENTAL ADJUSTMENT
  • HEALTH LOCUS
  • THREAT
  • REPRESENTATIONS
  • DEPRESSION
  • BEHAVIOR

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