The language barrier? Context, identity, and support for political goals in minority ethnolinguistic groups

Andrew G. Livingstone*, Antony S. R. Manstead, Russell Spears, Dafydd Bowen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In two studies, we tested the hypothesis that not having a potentially group-defining attribute (e.g., in-group language) can affect social identification and support for group goals (e.g., national autonomy). Focusing on the Welsh minority in the UK, Study 1 provided evidence that Welsh language fluency predicted Welsh identification and support for national autonomy, and that identification accounted for the languageautonomy association. Study 2 extended this by (1) examining British and English as well as Welsh identification; and (2) quasi-manipulating the surrounding context (Welsh speaking vs. non-Welsh speaking). As predicted, low Welsh language fluency predicted stronger British and English identification, but only where language was criterial (Welsh-speaking regions). British identification, in turn, predicted lower support for national autonomy. Implications and prospects for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)747-768
Number of pages22
JournalBritish Journal of Social Psychology
Volume50
Issue number4 SI
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec-2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • COLLECTIVE ACTION
  • INGROUP MEMBERS
  • SOCIAL IDENTITY
  • WELSH IDENTITY
  • WALES
  • IDENTIFICATION
  • DIFFERENTIATION
  • PSYCHOLOGY
  • DIVERSITY
  • EXTREMITY

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