The nature of coordination and control problems in children with developmental coordination disorder during ball catching: A systematic review

Dagmar F A A Derikx*, Marina M Schoemaker

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

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    Abstract

    The aim of this review was to examine what is presently known about the nature of motor coordination and control problems in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) during ball catching and to provide directions for future research. A systematic literature search was conducted using four electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO and Web of Science), which identified 15 eligible studies. The results of the included studies were discussed, structured around the target population characteristics, the task used to measure motor coordination and control aspects, and the type of outcome. Children with DCD experience difficulties with both motor coordination and control during ball catching. They have been suggested to apply four compensation strategies to overcome these difficulties: a later initiation of the reaching phase, an earlier initiation of the grasping phase, a higher degree of coupling of the joints both intraand inter-limb, and fixating the joints. However, despite these compensation strategies, children with DCD still caught fewer balls than typically developing children in all studies. This was especially due to a higher amount of grasping errors, which indicates a problem with the timing of the grasping phase. Directions for future research and practical implications were discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number102688
    Pages (from-to)1-13
    Number of pages13
    JournalHuman Movement Science
    Volume74
    Early online date2020
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec-2020

    Keywords

    • DCD
    • Ball catching
    • Degrees of freedom problem
    • Coordination pattern
    • Childhood development
    • MOVEMENT COORDINATION
    • TASK CONSTRAINTS
    • BOYS
    • PERFORMANCE
    • ADOLESCENTS
    • SKILLS
    • GRASP

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