The risk of venous and arterial thrombosis in hyperhomocysteinemic subjects may be a result of elevated factor VIII levels

Willem M. Lijfering*, Nic J. G. M. Veeger, Jan-Leendert P. Brouwer, Jan Van der Meer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

In a large retrospective study of thrombophilic families, we analyzed 405 relatives of patients, hypothesizing that hyperhomocysteinemia and elevated factor VIII levels are closely related. Median factor VIII levels in hyperhomocysteinemic relatives were 169 IU/dL, compared with 136 IU/dL in normohomocysteinemic relatives (p=0.007), and were more often elevated (>150 IU/dL; p=0.006). Hyperhomocysteinemia was associated with an increased risk of venous and arterial thrombosis; relative risk (RR) 2.6 (CI 1.3-4.8) and 3.7 (CI 1.5-8.4) respectively. Relatives with elevated FVIII were also at risk; RR 2.3 (CI 1.4-4.0) for venous thrombosis and 2.3 (CI 1.0-5.1) for arterial thrombosis. After excluding all relatives with elevated factor VIII, RR for hyperhomocysteinernia and venous thrombosis dropped to 1.3 (CI 0.2-9.8) and no relatives had arterial thrombosis. We conclude that it is likely that the increased risk of venous and arterial thrombosis in hyperhomocysteinemia is mainly related to elevated FVIII levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1703-1706
Number of pages4
JournalHaematologica
Volume92
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec-2007

Keywords

  • thrombosis
  • hyperhomocysteinemia
  • factor VIII
  • DEEP-VEIN THROMBOSIS
  • B-VITAMINS
  • HOMOCYSTEINE
  • THROMBOEMBOLISM
  • DISEASE
  • PATHOGENESIS
  • METAANALYSIS

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