The role of psychology in behavioral economics: The case of social preferences

Chiara Lisciandra*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Behavioral economics is a field of study that is often thought of as interdisciplinary, insofar as it uses psychological insights to inform economic models. Yet the level of conceptual and methodological exchange between the two disciplines is disputed in the literature. On the one hand, behavioral economic models are often presented as psychologically informed models of individual decision-making (Camerer & Loewenstein, 2003). On the other hand, these models have often been criticized for being merely more elaborated "as if" economic models (Berg & Gigerenzer, 2010). The aim of this paper is to contribute to this debate by looking at a central topic in behavioral economics: the case of social preferences. Have findings or research methods been exchanged between psychology and economics in this research area? Have scientists with different backgrounds "travelled" across domains, thus transferring their expertise from one discipline to another? By addressing these and related questions, this paper will assess the level of knowledge transfer between psychology and economics in the study of social preferences. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11-21
Number of pages11
JournalStudies in History and Philosophy of Science. Part A
Volume72
Early online date26-Mar-2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec-2018

Keywords

  • ULTIMATUM GAME
  • FAIRNESS
  • COMPETITION
  • AVERSION
  • HISTORY
  • CHOICE
  • MODEL

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