The Role of Pubertal Timing and Heterosocial Involvement in Early Adolescents’ Media Internalization: A Moderated Moderation Analysis

Ann Rousseau*, Helene Laporte, Felix Grundmann, Steven Eggermont

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

80 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The present three-wave panel study (N = 968, (Formula presented.) = 11.30, SD = 1.06) examines how developmental factors—pubertal timing and heterosocial involvement (i.e., one’s involvement in cross-sex activities)—influence early adolescents’ level of media internalization. We hypothesized that early pubertal timing positively moderates the association between sexualizing magazine reading and media internalization. Next, we argued that increased heterosocial involvement will weaken the amplifying influence of early pubertal timing on the aforementioned relationship. Both hypotheses were confirmed. For early adolescents who mature earlier than same-age/sex peers, reading sexualizing magazines resulted in more media internalization. Furthermore, our results showed that moderate to high cross-sex peer interactions can serve as a protective force against the negative influence of early pubertal timing. These results highlight the influential role of appearance-related developmental factors in the processing of sexualizing magazine content and point to the potential protective role of cross-sex peer interactions in media internalization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1167-1194
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Early Adolescence
Volume40
Issue number8
Early online date25-Jan-2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1-Oct-2020

Keywords

  • LIMITED CAPACITY MODEL
  • BODY-IMAGE DISTURBANCE
  • SOCIOCULTURAL ATTITUDES
  • APPEARANCE CULTURE
  • DISSATISFACTION
  • GIRLS
  • TELEVISION
  • BOYS
  • OBJECTIFICATION
  • ASSOCIATIONS

Cite this