Transfer of bacteria between biomaterials surfaces in the operating room - An experimental study

Bas A. S. Knobben, Henny C. van der Mei*, Jim R. van Horn, Henk J. Busscher

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bacterial adhesion to and transfer between surfaces is a complicated process. With regard to the success of biomaterials implants, studies on bacterial adhesion and transfer should not be confined to biomaterials surfaces in the human body, but also encompass surfaces in the operating room, where the origin of many biomaterials related infections is found. The purpose of this study was to quantify the transfer of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Propionibacterium acnes from one operating room material to another, while accounting for surface hydrophobicity and roughness, moistness and application of friction during transfer. The tested operating room materials were gloves, broaches (orthopaedic drills), theatre gowns, and light handles. As a possible clinical intervention method to prevent transfer, it was investigated whether dipping the gloves in a chlorhexidine splash-basin affected the viability of the transferred bacteria. Transfer (moist and without friction) was demonstrated to some extent with all bacterial strains and with every material, ranging from 17% to 71%, and was influenced by the bacterial strain, moistness of the inoculum, the application of friction, and the characteristics of both the donating and the receiving surface. Dipping the glove material in 4% or 0.4% chlorhexidine solutions killed all bacteria present, regardless of whether surfaces were dried or moist and thus prevented transfer. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)790-799
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A
Volume80A
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15-Mar-2007

Keywords

  • bacterial adhesion
  • hydrophilicity
  • surface roughness
  • transfer
  • operating room
  • TOTAL HIP-ARTHROPLASTY
  • STAPHYLOCOCCUS-AUREUS
  • IN-VIVO
  • CONTAMINATION
  • ADHESION
  • CHLORHEXIDINE
  • REPLACEMENT
  • INFECTION
  • CONTACT
  • HYDROPHOBICITY

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