Trends in vital signs and routine biomarkers in patients with sepsis during resuscitation in the emergency department: A prospective observational pilot study

Vincent M. Quinten*, Matijs van Meurs, Jan C. ter Maaten, Jack J. M. Ligtenberg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Objectives Sepsis lacks a reliable and readily available measure of disease activity. Thereby, it remains unclear how to monitor response to treatment. Research on numerous (new) biomarkers associated with sepsis provided disappointing results and little is known about changes in vital signs during sepsis resuscitation. We hypothesised that trends in vital signs together with routine biomarker levels during resuscitation might provide information about the response to treatment at a very early stage of sepsis in the emergency department (ED). We therefore explore trends in vital signs and routine biomarker levels during sepsis resuscitation in the ED.

Design Prospective observational pilot study.

Setting ED of a tertiary care teaching hospital.

Participants 99 Adult non-trauma patients with suspected infection and 2 or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria admitted to the ED.

Primary and secondary outcome measures Vital signs and biomarker levels at admittance (T0) and after 3h in the ED (T1).

Results In total, data of 99 patients were analysed. Of these patients, 63 presented with sepsis, 30 with severe sepsis and 6 with septic shock. All vital signs decreased, except for peripheral oxygen saturation which increased. Almost all routine biomarker levels decreased during resuscitation, except for C reactive protein, bands, potassium, troponin T and direct bilirubin which remained stable. Sodium, chloride and N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide increased slightly.

Conclusions Vital signs and biomarker levels showed descending trends during resuscitation, except for parameters directly affected by treatment modalities. Despite these trends, most patients improved clinically. Trends in vital signs and routine biomarkers might be helpful in predicting clinical course and response to treatment in patients with sepsis during early resuscitation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number009718
Number of pages10
JournalBMJ Open
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • INFECTIOUS DISEASES
  • ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY MEDICINE
  • CLINICAL PHYSIOLOGY
  • SEPTIC SHOCK
  • 4-HOUR RULE
  • CARE
  • MANAGEMENT
  • THERAPY
  • TRIAL

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