Using the Selection, Optimization, and Compensation Model of Action-Regulation to Explain College Students’ Grades and Study Satisfaction

Darya Moghimi*, Nico W. Van Yperen*, Florian Sense, Hannes Zacher, Susanne Scheibe

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Statistics on study disruptions and delays and their negative impact on academic performance call for action-regulation strategies that students can use to manage their performance and well-being. In the present research, we rely on the action-regulation model of selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC), which was developed in the life span developmental literature. The aim of the present study was to establish indirect links between two specific SOC components (i.e., elective selection and optimiza- tion) and study outcomes (i.e., end-of-first-year average grade and study satisfaction) through higher self-efficacy beliefs. In 2 prospective studies conducted during 2 subsequent academic years, we tested our research model with first-year undergraduate students (n ﰀ 366 in Study 1 and n ﰀ 242 in Study 2). Results of both studies indicate that there are positive indirect relations between optimization, but not elective selection, and favorable study outcomes through self-efficacy beliefs. The present study con- tributes to SOC theory and the educational sciences by showing that the SOC model of action-regulation can be helpful in explaining college students’ grades and study satisfaction.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-196
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume113
Issue number1
Early online date2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan-2021

Keywords

  • SELF-EFFICACY BELIEFS
  • SOCIAL-COGNITIVE DETERMINANTS
  • LIFE-MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES
  • POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT
  • AGE-RELATED DIFFERENCES
  • JOB-SATISFACTION
  • ACHIEVEMENT GOALS
  • PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
  • HIGH-SCHOOL
  • PERFORMANCE

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