When a Sense of "We" Is Lost: Investigating the Consequences of a Lost Common Identity Among Druze in Israel

Tamar Saguy*, Danit Sobol-Sarag, Samer Halabi, Katherine Stroebe, Emile Bruneau, Siwar Hasan-Aslih

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Research shows that inclusive identities are effective for improving intergroup relations. Little work, however, asked what happens once a sense of common identity is formed, but then lost. Given increasing diversity and integration attempts that might fail, this question is realistic and timely. We studied a religious minority in Israel, Arab-Druze (N = 178), constituting 1.6% of the population. Druze have always had strong common ties with the Jewish majority, particularly younger Druze who serve in the Israeli army. We surveyed Druze in the aftermath of the nationality bill, which was considered by many to be highly exclusionary toward non-Jews. Drawing on research on minority exclusion, we expected that for younger Druze, a sense of common identity loss will predict radical forms of action. This was supported by our cross-sectional data and remained stable after controlling for more classic predictors of violent and nonviolent action.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1948550619884562
Pages (from-to)667-675
Number of pages9
JournalSocial Psychological and Personality Science
Volume11
Issue number5
Early online date19-Nov-2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul-2020

Keywords

  • common identity
  • radicalism
  • collective action
  • COLLECTIVE ACTION
  • INTERGROUP CONTACT
  • SOCIAL IDENTITY
  • DUAL IDENTITY
  • QUEST

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