When and how groups utilize dissenting newcomer knowledge: Newcomers' future prospects condition the effect of language-based identity strategies

Aimee A. Kane*, Floor Rink

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two experiments suggest that newcomers' structural role (permanent vs. temporary appointment) in the groups they enter conditions the extent to which their use of language-based identity strategies (integrating vs. differentiating) influences groups' willingness to accept them and utilize their dissenting task knowledge. For newcomers with permanent future prospects, the use of integrating pronouns leads to greater acceptance than the use of differentiating pronouns, and newcomer acceptance is in turn a key mediator of groups' willingness to utilize their knowledge. For newcomers with temporary future prospects, however, the use of integrating pronouns (vs. differentiating pronouns) does not positively influence their acceptance, nor does newcomer acceptance determine the willingness of groups to utilize their knowledge. The theory supported by these studies advances group socialization literature by elucidating when and how groups are receptive to dissenting newcomers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)591-607
Number of pages17
JournalGroup Processes & Intergroup Relations
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep-2016

Keywords

  • deviance in groups
  • group receptivity to newcomers
  • group roles
  • group socialization
  • knowledge utilization
  • social acceptance
  • temporary and nonstandard workers
  • MEDIATION ANALYSIS
  • GROUP MEMBERSHIP
  • WORK
  • EMPLOYMENT
  • TEAMS
  • SOCIALIZATION
  • ASSIMILATION
  • ACCEPTANCE
  • OUTCOMES
  • OTHERS

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