Data from: A cross-scale trophic cascade from large predatory fish to algae in coastal ecosystems

  • Serena Donadi (Stockholm Univ, Stockholm University, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci DEEP) (Creator)
  • A. N. Austin (Creator)
  • Ulf Bergstrom (Creator)
  • Britas Klemens Eriksson (Creator)
  • J. P. Hansen (Creator)
  • Lisa P. Jacobson (Creator)
  • Goran Sundblad (Creator)
  • Marin van Regteren (Creator)
  • Johan S. Eklof (Creator)

Dataset

Description

Trophic cascades occur in many ecosystems, but the factors regulating them are still elusive. We suggest that an overlooked factor is that trophic interactions (TIs) are often scale-dependent and possibly interact across spatial scales. To explore the role of spatial scale for trophic cascades, and particularly the occurrence of cross-scale interactions (CSIs), we collected and analysed food-web data from 139 stations across 32 bays in the Baltic Sea. We found evidence of a four-level trophic cascade linking TIs across two spatial scales: at bay scale, piscivores (perch and pike) controlled mesopredators (three-spined stickleback), which in turn negatively affected epifaunal grazers. At station scale (within bays), grazers on average suppressed epiphytic algae, and indirectly benefitted habitat-forming vegetation. Moreover, the direction and strength of the grazer–algae relationship at station scale depended on the piscivore biomass at bay scale, indicating a cross-scale interaction effect, potentially caused by a shift in grazer assemblage composition. In summary, the trophic cascade from piscivores to algae appears to involve TIs that occur at, but also interact across, different spatial scales. Considering scale-dependence in general, and CSIs in particular, could therefore enhance our understanding of trophic cascades.

The data package contains one dataset:
- This file contains data on fish, vegetation, epiphytic algae and abiotic conditions at bay and station scale.
Datum van beschikbaarheid3-aug-2017
UitgeverUniversity of Groningen
Geografische dekkingThe Baltic Sea

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