Introduction: The Metaphor of Historical Distance

Jaap Den Hollander*, Herman Paul, Rik Peters

*Bijbehorende auteur voor dit werk

    OnderzoeksoutputAcademicpeer review

    13 Citaten (Scopus)

    Samenvatting

    What does "historical distance" mean? Starting with Johan Huizinga, the famous Dutch historian who refused to lecture on contemporary history, this introductory article argues that "historical distance" is a metaphor used in a variety of intellectual contexts. Accordingly, the metaphor has ontological, epistemological, moral, aesthetic, as well as methodological connotations. This implies that historical distance cannot be reduced to a single "problem" or "concept." At the same time, this wide variety of meanings associated with distance helps explain why an easily recognizable tradition of scholarly reflection on historical distance does not exist. In a broad survey of nineteenth-and twentieth-century historical theory, this article nonetheless attempts to show that distance has been a major, if seldom explicitly articulated, theme in European and American philosophy of history. In doing so, it pays special attention to those few authors who in recent years have taken up the metaphor for critical study. Finally, the paper summarizes some of the main arguments put forward in the articles comprising this issue on historical distance.

    Originele taal-2English
    Pagina's (van-tot)1-10
    Aantal pagina's10
    TijdschriftHistory and Theory
    Volume50
    Nummer van het tijdschrift4
    DOI's
    StatusPublished - dec-2011

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