Smoking cessation improves both direct and indirect airway hyperresponsiveness in COPD

BWM Willemse*, NHT ten Hacken, B Rutgers, IGAT Lesman-Leegte, W Timens, DS Postma

*Bijbehorende auteur voor dit werk

OnderzoeksoutputAcademicpeer review

50 Citaten (Scopus)

Samenvatting

Smoking induces chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is associated with airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). It has not been studied in COPD whether direct (methacholine) and indirect (adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP)) stimuli are associated with airway inflammation and neither whether smoking cessation improves these features.

The current authors cross-sectionally investigated the relationship of AHR to methacholine and AMP with lung function and inflammatory cells in the sputum of 33 smokers with COPD. In addition, changes in these parameters were prospectively assessed in 14 smokers who successfully quit smoking for 1 yr.

The presence of AHR to both methacholline and AMP was associated with lower lung function, but not with sputum inflammation. AHR to methacholine and AMP improved significantly after a 1-yr smoking cessation, yet this was unrelated to changes in sputum cell counts. The numbers of neutrophils and epithelial cells significantly increased with smoking cessation.

Both direct and indirect airway hyperresponsiveness are associated with lower lung function, but not with sputum inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Interestingly, 1-yr smoking cessation improved both direct and indirect airway hyperresponsiveness, yet without a significant association with changes in lung function or sputum inflammation. Thus, other factors are likely to induce these improvements, e.g. a reduction in stimulation of irritant receptors, airway wall changes or mucus hypersecretion.

Originele taal-2English
Pagina's (van-tot)391-396
Aantal pagina's6
TijdschriftEuropean Respiratory Journal
Volume24
Nummer van het tijdschrift3
DOI's
StatusPublished - sep.-2004

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