When individuals dislike exposure to an actively coping role model: mood change as related to depression and social comparison orientation

Abraham (Bram) Buunk, V. Brenninkmeyer

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    23 Citaten (Scopus)

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    A total of 122 individuals, including those clinically, depressed and nondepressed, were exposed to a description of a target who overcame his or her depression either through active coping (high effort), or seemingly by itself (low effort). Participants first completed the Beck Depression Inventory and the Iowa-Netherlands Comparison Orientation Measure. As predicted, among the nondepressed, with increasing levels of social comparison orientation, a high effort target evoked a relatively more positive mood change, and a low-effort target a relatively more negative one. In contrast, among the depressed, with increasing levels of social comparison orientation, a low-effort target evoked a relatively more positive mood change, and a high-effort target a relatively more negative one. The implications are that exposure to active role models may worsen a depression, and that social comparison orientation may have clinical implications. Copyright (C) 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    Originele taal-2English
    Pagina's (van-tot)537-548
    Aantal pagina's12
    TijdschriftEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
    Volume31
    Nummer van het tijdschrift5
    DOI's
    StatusPublished - 2001

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